A German Requiem

Brahms’ comforting masterpiece conducted by Dinis Sousa

The Concertgebouw Orchestra in Ein deutsches Requiem with conductor Dinis Sousa, the Monteverdi Choir, baritone Christian Gerhaher and soprano Lenneke Ruiten – in her Concertgebouw Orchestra debut.

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Dinis Sousa
dates and tickets
In Ein deutsches Requiem for chorus, orchestra, and soloists, everything falls into place.

The Concertgebouw Orchestra in Ein deutsches Requiem with conductor Dinis Sousa, the Monteverdi Choir, baritone Christian Gerhaher and soprano Lenneke Ruiten – in her Concertgebouw Orchestra debut.

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In Ein deutsches Requiem for chorus, orchestra, and soloists, everything falls into place.

Concert programme

  • Heinrich Schütz

    Selig sind die Toten, die in dem Herren sterben

  • Johann Christoph Bach Bach

    Der Gerechte, ob er gleich zu zeitlich stirbt

  • Johannes Brahms

    Ein deutsches Requiem

Performers

Dates and tickets

About this concert

The highly acclaimed Monteverdi Choir and its associate conductor Dinis Sousa will be visiting Amsterdam for performances of Brahms’ Ein deutsches Requiem with the Concertgebouw Orchestra. With this large-scale but restrained ‘requiem for humanity,’ Brahms created a Protestant, German-language answer to the more-common requiem mass in Latin. A requiem not for the dead, but to console those left behind.  

This collaboration with the Concertgebouw Orchestra will undoubtedly be a highlight of the concert season. Especially with the addition of baritone Christian Gerhaher and soprano Lenneke Ruiten, who, like Dinis Sousa, will be making her debut with the orchestra. In Ein deutsches Requiem for chorus, orchestra and soloists, everything falls into place. 

Brahms’ body of works clearly shows the influence of the early masters of polyphony. More specifically, Brahms was a great admirer of Heinrich Schütz, the leading Lutheran Protestant composer prior to the advent of Johann Sebastian Bach. Choral works by Schütz and Johann Christoph Bach (the Great, a distant relative of Johann Sebastian) point the way to Brahms’ Ein deutsches Requiem in their lyrics and text treatment.

Sir John Eliot Gardiner has withdrawn from these performances for personal reasons.

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