16-20 September 2020

Kirill Gerstein plays Shostakovich

Originally subscription B (Sep 16, Sep 17), E (Sep 18) & Z (Sep 20)

Dvořák’s Symphony No. 8

Tickets & ProgrammeAudio & Video
These concerts are unplaced. You can indicate with your order whether you want to sit in the main hall, on the balcony or on stage. Your seat will be designated on the spot by one of the staff of the Concertgebouw.
September 2020 Wednesday 20:15
Het Concertgebouw, Amsterdam
The Netherlands
past concert
September 2020 Thursday 19:00
Het Concertgebouw, Amsterdam
The Netherlands
past concert
September 2020 Thursday 21:15
Het Concertgebouw, Amsterdam
The Netherlands
past concert
September 2020 Friday 20:15
Het Concertgebouw, Amsterdam
The Netherlands
past concert
September 2020 Sunday 13:30
Het Concertgebouw, Amsterdam
The Netherlands
past concert
September 2020 Sunday 15:45
Het Concertgebouw, Amsterdam
The Netherlands
past concert
Dmitri Shostakovich Piano Concerto No. 1
Antonín Dvořák Symphony No. 8

Dvořák’s energetic Eighth Symphony is the perfect match for Semyon Bychkov and the Concertgebouworkest. As is Shostakovich’s playful First Piano Concerto, with a brilliant role for Kirill Gerstein and principal trumpet player Miroslav Petkov.

The most energetic and upbeat of all

Of all the symphonies Dvořák wrote, the Eighth is his most energetic and upbeat. Here he casts off his melancholy side and abandons himself to his love of Czech folk music. Conductor Semyon Bychkov has made frequent guest appearances with the Concertgebouworkest. Here he once again showcases his familiarity with the Slavic repertoire. In addition to Dvořák’s Eighth Symphony, the programme features an equally sunny work by Dmitry Shostakovich.

Shostakovich’s First Piano Concerto

Shostakovich’s First Piano Concerto is an unusual piece in which the tormented music of his symphonies cedes to exuberant playfulness. Shostakovich also quotes all sorts of other composers and incorporates bristly folk tunes. Yet none of this detracts from the astonishing virtuosity of the work. It is actually a double concerto, since the piano is constantly opposed by a solo trumpet. Indeed, their pointed dialogues make it one of the most amusing Russian concertos ever written.

 

Audio & Video